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the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
recounts the life of america's sixth president on quincy adams who died in 1848. quincy adams was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
visit booktv.org. >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennesse
-- abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves and settle them on land as sharecroppers in the '70s that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states but when he got back to the united states things change. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> next on booktv, greg gutfield fox news's the five says liberals use manufactured our rage and artificial tolerance to deflect criticism of their political and social ideology. the author contends what he deems smart in tolerance should be used to counter liberal argument. it is about an hour. >> thank you. the first library i have been in where i haven't been asked to leave. i am not kidding, actually. i will get to that library joke in a minute. that was going to be my intro but during the signing nymex so many nice people when i was sitting there and are missing their going what would it be like if all of your fans were jerks? wouldn't that tell you something? if all of your fans -- i can't swear in the reagan library but if they were jerks, what if you were bi
of contemporary writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect a writer who has come for a visit and not treat that writer like some sort of circus side show. and to engage that person in conversation. we often like to say and joking among ourselves that we invite writers to dinner, and we just have these couple of public events on either side of the dinner or some gathering after one of those public events. what really happens is sitting down and having good conversation. it brings writers back. it's actually one of the things that people, i think, most appreciate about the writer's institute. writers will be respected as writers. i remember one writer saying, you know, you go to some literary readings, and you think, gosh, i'm so glad i got through that. let me, you know, catch the next plane out. you go to the writer's institute, and you find yourself saying, wow, that was good. i hope they invite me back. >> mom and dad were high school teachers, so we would take family vacations across
successful at cost control and private insurers have been, the great thing about america is we have everything, all possible assistance here. the veterans health administration which is true socialized medicine, the doctors are government employees, is incredibly efficient relative to the rest of the health-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signa
proprietary not in a bad way that in a quite paternal because they cared about the definition of america and the survival and success of america. they did that what drove jefferson this case is the fear that would be swallowed up as a free of the revolution virtually in the world had been by the forces of reaction. i argue in the book that it's impossible life and to understand early american history without seeing the period between the end of the french and indian war and 7063 and the end of the war in 1815 as a 50 year war with britain sometimes hot and sometimes cold but always there. in precise analogy but it would be writing about washington, adams, jefferson, hamilton without reference to this struggle. i think would be like riding but truman, eisenhower, kennedy, johnson, nixon, ford, carter, ronald reagan and not mentioning the soviet union. the foreign policy was that significant and his domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is that they did. so you win the argument. the war of 1812
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time, the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the newly uncovered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war on vietnam drew the funding away from shriver's operation and offered a choice between war and asia and in poverty. johnson relucta
.01%, it amounted to about 4.2 million per family. so when you think about why is there this polarization in america, why are there these very different views about the world, you know, part of it is there are very different worlds that people are inhabits. having said that, so, you know, my premise is this isn't just a case of the rich have always been with us. something really different is happening, and it's important for us to talk about it, to research it, to figure out what's going on. but actually, there is a real reluctance, and i have admit particularly here in america, and i'm canadian, so i see you guys with a little bit of a distance. [laughter] particularly in america there is a reluctance to talk about these issues of income distribution. and one of my friends who was supposed to be here tonight, i talked to him about this, and he said that it's -- i'm going to quote him because it was such a nice line. so he said: i was once told by the head of a prestigious think tank in washington, d.c. that the think tank's board was very unlikely to fund any work that had income or wealth inequali
to the country at the age of 20. he had nothing with him. but he had one thing nobody had in america. it was extremely quality which was the knowledge of how to die so. there was no silk industry in this country at that time. they did not know how to make machinery, a diet, have the tools, everything was trial and error to create the silk industry. it was our industrial revolution how we get in on the trade? there's so much money to be made in silk. it is hard to appreciate what it meant to the culture back then. before the age of synthetic fabrics and designers fabric was fashion and silk was the ultimate in style to represent prestige, prosperity, a success. america wanted its own silk industry. skinner would say nobody comes over with and ambition not to wear the silk dress. everybody wanted so. he came to the country with knowledge and was a pioneer in the industry. established its. a founding member of the american soccer association and he took that one in this bill into opportunity after opportunity. to the point* he had his own and silk mill. it was a prosperous an entire vil
, physical consistency. i will focus on bans of america and arguments can certainly be in other cases. i will argue the five most prominent arguments in favor of banning of a gurkha automating consistency in ways that favor majority practice -- the idea of equal respect for all people from which this spring as. all cases of what might turn to the christian tradition against itself called cases of seeing demoting your brother's eye while failing to appreciate the large plank in your own eyes, all target situations alleged to be present in muslim communities failing to note their ubiquity in the worst form in the majority culture. let's look at how each is treated with equal respect. first, is an argument that holds security requires people to show their face when appearing in public places. a second closely related argument which i will treat with that says that the argument of transparency, it says the kind of transparency and reciprocity proper to relations between citizens is impeded by covering part of the face. what is wrong with both of these arguments is they are applied totally in
that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother as a child and she looked birds and animals and was fascinated from a very early age. she was a gifted student and a talented
in little america of the war within the war for afghanistan, washington post senior correspondent reports on the military and government failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gives him an editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it
. the two sons traveled all over the world, including to america, across europe and asia. and ultimately it came to no avail. .. >> it was 20 years after a very bloody partition, and it was a time in government that was a time of great possibility. the country's first constitution was written in 1973. the last land reform you had done were carried out in that period. you had an incredibly progressive government. i just came from england doing a talk there, and it was in the 1970s that marital rape or earlier was considered a crime, but it was something, like, 1984 before the united king dome deemed marital rape a crime. there was a progressive period, not to say it was without fault. certainly, it was made, errors made, grievance ones, in his time. there was the first ever islamic conference, and it was a source of great pride for pakistanis, and they were asked to open up their homes for delegates combing from all over the world, open their home, and make space for them. they had to open their homes because many came uninvited, and there was a substantial entourage that required more sp
doctor who had an incredible things for america. to make a long story short, he sent general david petraeus and e-mail landon ten minutes got back to me and we had for the next three months general david petraeus, people basically had gone in and worked, the letters had been written to basically create a justification, an exception. three days ago he will be laid to rest in darlington. [applause] >> did dog company receive any proper recognition for what they did? >> i am so pleased many of the family and people that i know very personally are here. bob, you were a member of george company 3 one in the chosen reservoir. part of a book i wrote called give me tomorrow, you were a machine gunner and it is an honor to have you here. like george company, for the most part dog company hasn't received as much recognition as they deserve. they received a presidential citation for their actions at pointe du hoc, but hills 400 remains an open issue. they deserve a presidential citation for that action. they charged that hill and held against all odds. the last letter to tom, one of my main c
. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogspot throughout the war in w
nothing of material worth with him, he was too poor. but he had one thing that no one in america had at that time, and it was an extremely valuable and tangible quality. or knowledge, i should say. and that was the knowledge of how to dye silk. there was no silk industry in this country at that time. no one knew how to dye it, they didn't know how to manufacture it, they didn't know how to make the machinery, they didn't have the tools for the man -- machinery, everything was trial and error to try to create a silk industry. it was the upbuilding of our domestic industries. it was our industrial revolution. how do we get in on this trade? there was so much money to be made in silk. and it's hard for us to appreciate today what it meant to our culture back then. but before the age of synthetic fabrics, before the age of designers, silk was the ultimate in style. it represented prestige, prosperity, success. so america wanted its own silk industry. skinner used to say there's not an irish servant girl who comes over to this country whose ambition is not to wear a silk dress. everyone w
an american citizen as well as a world-renowned heart doctor that had done incredible things for america. to make a long story short, sent general petraeus ap e-mail, in ten minutes he got back to me, and we had for the next three months so-com, general petraeus, people had basically gone in and worked -- had written, the letters had been written to basically create a justification, an exception. three days ago rene will be laid to rest in arlington. [applause] yes, bob. >> dog company, do you see any proper recognition for what they did if. >> you know, i'm so pleased that many of the family and people that i know very perm hi are here -- personally are here. bob, you were a member of george company 3-1 in the chosen reservoir. part of a book i wrote called "give me a tomorrow," and you were a a machine gunner and it's really an honor to have you here, like george company for the most part dog company hasn't received as much recognition as they deserve. they received a presidential unit citation for their actions, but hill 400 remains an open issue. they deserve the presidential unit ci
sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940, which is essentially -- >> that's right. >> the segment of your book, final question. let people read ot
these relations. >> on the book i talk about is this unique to america, that the public is fascinated with the scandal? i think there are reasons to be angry at bill clinton reasons to not be angry at bill clinton over the monica lewinsky thing but at one level you could say the economy was moving and we were at peace and things were happening and we are angry because the president received essential favors from a young woman. here's a newsflash. well, read the book. whereas in france, the joke is they wouldn't elect a leader who didn't have the stresses. i don't want a gelding in this race. so what we see is the marriages tend to have i guess a bit more as a prudish view toward sexual affairs than folks around the world and in the end of the book in the last chapter i offer some comparisons. this thing happens all around the world that we in the united states tend to be more infatuated because of our freedoms and because we don't have a royal family that we can be fascinated with. the president becomes a monarch and if resident. i don't know what it is, up that yeah frances had a num
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